Information for record number MWA1825:
Iron Age Hillfort at Meon Hill

Summary An Iron Age hillfort on Meon Hill, the remains of which are visible as earthworks. Excavation and site surveys have recorded the layout of the ramparts and internal features as well as producing a variety of finds.
What Is It?  
Type: Hillfort, Earthwork
Period: Iron Age (800 BC - 42 AD)
Where Is It?  
Parish: Quinton
District: Stratford on Avon, Warwickshire
Grid Reference: SP 17 45
(Data represented on this map shows the current selected record as a single point, this is for illustrative purposes only and does not represent an accurate or complete representation of archaeological sites or features)
Level of Protection National - Old SMR PrefRef (Grade: )
Scheduled Monument (Grade: )
Sites & Monuments Record
Picture(s) attached

 
Description

 
Source Number  

1 At an elevation of 194m on the flat top of a hill conspicuous for miles around. Originally the hill was encircled by a double line of defences. In 1906 these were best preserved on the SW and SE. On the E the rampart had been levelled by ploughing and a gap in the W is probably the result of a landslip. At the SE the ditch/bank is up to 4.6m deep. In 1906 the interior was divided up into a N (ploughed) and a S (unploughed) field. Many artefacts were found in the ploughed interior. These included Neolithic/Bronze Age finds (PRN 5456, PRN 5457) and fragments of 'Neolithic' - probably actually Iron Age - pottery. In 1824 a large hoard of 394 currency bars was found (PRN 5458). Romano British finds have also been made (PRN 5460) along with three ?Iron Age whetstones. An excavation was carried out in 1906 (PRN 5459). On the summit of the hill in undisturbed grassland were six or so slightly saucer-shaped depressions 4.3m to 6m in diameter. One of these was excavated and proved to be a hut (PRN 5459).
2 Further excavations were undertaken in 1922. He found much Romano British and earlier pottery, and one or two pieces of bronze and flint.
3 Major hillfort of impressive proportions. A fine entrance in the W face, but a break in the S defences seems quite modern.
4 Scheduled as Warwickshire Monument No 71.
5 A survey was conducted to record the topography of the ramparts, field walk the interior and catalogue/publish previous finds. The ramparts enclose 10.4 ha. Around the S side is a double-ditched rampart with a counterscarp. On the E the ramparts have been completely ploughed away. On the N there is a single bank and ditch. On the NW slope all the defences have been destroyed by landslipping. There are two possible entrances on the E and NW - the latter could be modern. Today the whole of the interior is under plough and there are no traces of the pit dwellings. The finds are in Cheltenham Museum and include Neolithic and Bronze Age material. Iron Age finds include a rotary beehive quern on the surface at the SE corner of the S field. field walking of the interior produced a sparse scatter of Iron Age pottery, animal bone, fired clay/daub, fire-cracked pebbles and possible sling stones. Pottery is uniformly shell-tempered. A Saxon burial has also been found (PRN 5461).
6 Iron Age pottery from the 1906 excavations dates to Marshall's phases 1-2 of the Iron Age.
7 Meon Hill Camp, multivallate, 24 acres enclosed. Original entrances not clear. Hoard of currency bars found within camp.
8 Air photograph.
9 Rescheduled as SM 21551.
10 Photo taken c1920.
11 Schedling list from 1986.
12 Correspondence about the state of the site in 1968.
13 List of the contents of a box of finds.
14 Correspondence from 1986 reporting the find of an Iron Age quern stone.
15 Correspondence about motorcycle damage to the site.
16 Letter from EH about the site.
17 Secondary record card with list of finds.
 
Sources

Source No: 8
Source Type: Aerial Photograph
Title:
Author/originator: J Pickering
Date: 1962
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: SP4489 C/D/E/X
   
Source No: 12
Source Type: Correspondence
Title: Meon Hill Hillfort
Author/originator: Various
Date: 1968
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 14
Source Type: Correspondence
Title: Meon Hill
Author/originator: Steane, John
Date: 1986
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 15
Source Type: Correspondence
Title: Meon Hill
Author/originator: Hatton, A.R.
Date: 1985
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 16
Source Type: Correspondence
Title: Meon Hill
Author/originator: Leigh, Judith
Date: 1991
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 13
Source Type: Note
Title: Meon Hill
Author/originator: Dyer, C
Date:
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 10
Source Type: Photograph
Title: Ancient British Camp, Meon Hill
Author/originator: Antona
Date: 1920
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 00345/ PH352/147/35
   
Source No: 3
Source Type: Record Card/Form
Title: OS Card 14NE9
Author/originator: Ordnance Survey
Date:
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 14NE9
   
Source No: 17
Source Type: Record Card/Form
Title: Meon Hill
Author/originator: WM
Date:
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 7
Source Type: Serial
Title: TBAS vol 86
Author/originator: Thomas N
Date: 1974
Page Number: 32
Volume/Sheet: 86
   
Source No: 2
Source Type: Serial
Title: TBAS vol 49
Author/originator: Andrews F B
Date: 1923
Page Number: 57
Volume/Sheet: 49
   
Source No: 5
Source Type: Serial
Title: WMA vol 25
Author/originator: Price E and Walton P
Date: 1982
Page Number: 78-82
Volume/Sheet: 25
   
Source No: 1
Source Type: Serial
Title: TBAS vol 32
Author/originator: Hodges T R
Date: 1906
Page Number: 101-15
Volume/Sheet: 32
   
Source No: 6
Source Type: Serial
Title: TBGAS
Author/originator: Marshall A
Date: 1978
Page Number: 17-26
Volume/Sheet: 96
   
Source No: 9
Source Type: Scheduling record
Title: Meon Hill
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1994
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 4
Source Type: Scheduling record
Title: Meon Hill Camp, Quinton
Author/originator: Ministry of Works/DoE
Date:
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 11
Source Type: Scheduling record
Title: Meon Hill Camp
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1986
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Images:  
Iron Age hillfort at Meon Hill, Quinton
Copyright: Warwickshire County Council
Date: 1994
Click here for larger image  
 
Iron Age hillfort, Meon Hill, Quinton
Copyright: Warwickshire County Council
Date: 1996
Click here for larger image  
 
A view of Meon Hill Iron Age Hillfort, Quinton
Copyright: Warwickshire County Council
Date: 1920
Click here for larger image  
 
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Glossary

 
Word or Phrase
Description  
none Scheduled Monument Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) are those archaeological sites which are legally recognised as being of national importance. They can range in date from prehistoric times to the Cold War period. They can take many different forms, including disused buildings or sites surviving as earthworks or cropmarks.

SAMs are protected by law from unlicensed disturbance and metal detecting. Written consent from the Secretary of State must be obtained before any sort of work can begin, including archaeological work such as geophysical survey or archaeological excavation. There are nearly 200 SAMs in Warwickshire.
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source OS Card Ordnance Survey Record Card. Before the 1970s the Ordnance Survey (OS) were responsible for recording archaeological monuments during mapping exercises. This helped the Ordnance Survey to decide which monuments to publish on maps. During these exercises the details of the monuments were written down on record cards. Copies of some of the cards are kept at the Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record. The responsibility for recording archaeological monuments later passed to the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments. back
source TBAS Transactions of the Birmingham and Warwickshire Archaeological Society is a journal produced by the society annually. It contains articles about archaeological field work that has taken place in Birmingham and Warwickshire in previous years. Copies of the journal are kept by the Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record. back
source WMA West Midlands Archaeology. This publication contains a short description for each of the sites where archaeological work has taken place in the previous year. It covers Herefordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire, West Midlands and Worcestershire. Some of these descriptions include photographs, plans and drawings of the sites and/or the finds that have been discovered. The publication is produced by the Council For British Archaeology (CBA) West Midlands and is published annually. Copies are held at the Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record. back
technique Earthwork Earthworks can take the form of banks, ditches and mounds. They are usually created for a specific purpose. A bank, for example, might be the remains of a boundary between two or more fields. Some earthworks may be all that remains of a collapsed building, for example, the grassed-over remains of building foundations.

In the winter, when the sun is lower in the sky than during the other seasons, earthworks have larger shadows. From the air, archaeologists are able to see the patterns of the earthworks more easily. Earthworks can sometimes be confusing when viewed at ground level, but from above, the general plan is much clearer.

Archaeologists often carry out an aerial survey or an earthwork survey to help them understand the lumps and bumps they can see on the ground.
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technique excavation Archaeologists excavate sites so that they can find information and recover archaeological materials before they are destroyed by erosion, construction or changes in land-use.

Depending on how complicated and widespread the archaeological deposits are, excavation can be done by hand or with heavy machinery. Archaeologists may excavate a site in a number of ways; either by open area excavation, by digging a test pit or a trial trench.
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period Modern The Modern Period, about 1915 AD to the present (the 20th and 21st centuries AD)

In recent years archaeologists have realised the importance of recording modern sites. They do this so that in the future people will be able to look at the remains to help them understand the events to which they are related.
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period Neolithic About 4000 BC to 2351 BC

The word ‘Neolithic’ means ‘New Stone Age’. Archaeologists split up the Neolithic period into three phases; early, middle and late. The Neolithic period comes after the Mesolithic period and before the Bronze Age.

People in the Neolithic period hunted and gathered food as their ancestors had but they were also began to farm. They kept animals and grew crops. This meant that they were able to settle more permanently in one location instead of constantly moving from place to place to look for food.
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period Bronze Age About 2500 BC to 700 BC

The Bronze Age comes after the Neolithic period and before the Iron Age.

The day to day life of people in the Bronze Age probably changed little from how their ancestors had lived during the Neolithic period. They still lived in farmsteads, growing crops and rearing animals.

During the Bronze Age people discovered how to use bronze, an alloy of tin and copper (hence the name that has given to this era). They used it to make their tools and other objects, although they continued to use flint and a range of organic materials as well. A range of bronze axes, palstaves and spears has been found in Warwickshire.
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period Iron Age About 800 BC to 43 AD

The Iron Age comes after the Bronze Age and before the Roman period. It is a time when people developed the skills and knowledge to work and use iron, hence the name ‘Iron Age’ which is given to this period. Iron is a much tougher and more durable metal than bronze but it also requires more skill to make objects from it. People continued to use bronze during this period.
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period modern About 1915 AD to the present (the 20th and 21st centuries AD)

In recent years archaeologists have realised the importance of recording modern sites. They do this so that in the future people will be able to look at the remains to help them understand the events to which they are related.
more ->
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monument SITE * Unclassifiable site with minimal information. Specify site type wherever possible. back
monument STONE * Use only where stone is natural or where there is no indication of function. back
monument FEATURE * Areas of indeterminate function. back
monument DWELLING * Places of residence. back
monument RAMPART * A protective earthen mound, often the main defence of a fortification. back
monument WALK * A place or path for walking in a park or garden. Use more specific type where possible. back
monument PIT * A hole or cavity in the ground, either natural or the result of excavation. Use more specific type where known. back
monument HUT * A building of basic construction, usually smaller in size than a house and constructed from a variety of materials such as mud, turf, branches, wood, brick, concrete or metal. Use more specific type where known. back
monument WELL * A shaft or pit dug in the ground over a supply of spring-water. back
monument FIELD * An area of land, often enclosed, used for cultivation or the grazing of livestock. back
monument MUSEUM * A building, group of buildings or space within a building, where objects of value such as works of art, antiquities, scientific specimens, or other artefacts are housed and displayed. back
monument DEFENCE * This is the top term for the class. See DEFENCE Class List for narrow terms. back
monument DITCH * A long and narrow hollow or trench dug in the ground, often used to carry water though it may be dry for much of the year. back
monument BURIAL * An interment of human or animal remains. Use specific type where known. If component use with wider site type. Use FUNERARY SITE for optimum retrieval in searches. back
monument BEEHIVE * A receptacle used as a home for bees, traditionally made of thick straw-work in the shape of a dome, but sometimes made of wood. back
monument HILLFORT * A hilltop enclosure bounded by one or more substantial banks, ramparts and ditches. Use more specific type where known. back
monument EARTHWORK * A bank or mound of earth used as a rampart or fortification. back

* Copyright of English Heritage (1999)

English Heritage National Monuments Record