Information for record number MWA285:
Coleshill Pillory

Summary Coleshill pillory, a wooden frame with holes for the offender's neck and wrists, which dates back to the Medieval period. The pillory also has stocks attached and acted as a whipping post. Originally situated in front of the Market Hall it is now on Church Street, Coleshill.
What Is It?  
Type: Pillory, Stocks, Whipping Post, Punishment Place
Period: Medieval - Imperial (1066 AD - 1913 AD)
Where Is It?  
Parish: Coleshill
District: North Warwickshire, Warwickshire
Grid Reference: SP 20 89
(Data represented on this map shows the current selected record as a single point, this is for illustrative purposes only and does not represent an accurate or complete representation of archaeological sites or features)
Level of Protection National - Old SMR PrefRef (Grade: )
Listed Building (Grade: II)
Sites & Monuments Record
Picture(s) attached

 
Description

 
Source Number  

1 The pillory stood in front of the Market Hall, which was demolished in 1865, when the pillory was moved to its present location. It has a post about 4.6m high with a turned moulded head, a platform or standing board and a transom with holes for the heads and hands of two persons. Lower are the shackles for whipping and at the foot one of the former pair for the stocks.
2 The pillory is unique in Warwickshire, and almost the whole country, because it has a three-fold combination of pillory, whipping post and stocks. It was last used in 1863.
4 Photographed in 1977.
 
Sources

Source No: 1
Source Type: Bibliographic reference
Title: Victoria County History, vol 4, Warwickshire
Author/originator: Salzman L F (ed)
Date: 1947
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 4
   
Source No: 2
Source Type: Desk Top Study
Title: LBL
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1951
Page Number: 5
Volume/Sheet: Tamworth Rural
   
Source No: 4
Source Type: Record Card/Form
Title: SMR card: photograph
Author/originator:
Date: 2005
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 3
Source Type: Unpublished document
Title: Attached to Pillory
Author/originator:
Date:
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Images:  
Coleshill Pillory, Coleshill
Copyright: Warwickshire County Council
Date: 1977
Click here for larger image  
 
Coleshill pillory, Church Street, Coleshill
Copyright: Warwickshire County Council
Date: 1910s
Click here for larger image  
 
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Glossary

 
Word or Phrase
Description  
designation Listed Building Buildings and structures, such as bridges, that are of architectural or historical importance are placed on a statutory list. These buildings are protected by planning and conservation acts that ensure that their special features of interest are considered before any alterations are made to them.

Depending on how important the buildings are they are classed as Grade I, Grade II* or Grade II. Grade I buildings are those of exceptional interest. Grade II* are particularly important buildings of more than special interest. Those listed as Grade II are those buildings that are regarded of special interest.
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source LBL Listed Building List. Buildings and structures, such as bridges, that are of architectural or historical importance are placed on a list. Buildings placed on the list are protected through various planning and conservation acts which ensure that their special features of interest are considered before any alterations are made to them. The Listed Buildings List is compiled and maintained by English Heritage. It includes details of where the building is, when it was built, a description of its appearance, and any other special features. back
source SMR Card Sites and Monuments Record Card. The Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record began to be developed during the 1970s. The details of individual archaeological sites and findspots were written on record cards. These record cards were used until the 1990s, when their details were entered on to a computerised system. The record cards are still kept at the office of the Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record. back
period Medieval 1066 AD to 1539 AD (the 11th century AD to the 16th century AD)

The medieval period comes after the Saxon period and before the post medieval period.

The Medieval period begins in 1066 AD.
This was the year that the Normans, led by William the Conqueror (1066 – 1087), invaded England and defeated Harold Godwinson at the Battle of Hastings in East Sussex.
The Medieval period includes the first half of the Tudor period (1485 – 1603 AD), when the Tudor family reigned in England and eventually in Scotland too.

The end of the Medieval period is marked by Henry VIII’s (1509 – 1547) order for the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the years running up to 1539 AD. The whole of this period is sometimes called the Middle Ages.
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period Imperial 1751 AD to 1914 AD (end of the 18th century AD to the beginning of the 20th century AD)

This period comes after the Post Medieval period and before the modern period and starts with beginning of the Industrial Revolution in 1750. It includes the second part of the Hannoverian period (1714 – 1836) and the Victorian period (1837 – 1901). The Imperial period ends with the start of the First World War in 1914.
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monument WHIPPING POST * A post set up, to which offenders were tied to be whipped. back
monument PILLORY * A wooden frame with holes, through which the head and hands of an offender were thrust, in which state they would be exposed to public ridicule and assault. back
monument CHURCH * A building used for public Christian worship. Use more specific type where known. back
monument PLATFORM * Unspecified. Use specific type where known. back
monument PUNISHMENT PLACE * A site where acts of corporal and capital punishment were carried out. back
monument MARKET HALL * A purpose built covered market hall, usually 19th century, although earlier examples do exist, eg. that at Abingdon, Oxfordshire c.1680. back
monument STOCKS * An instrument of punishment, in which the offender was placed in a sitting position in a timber frame, with holes to confine the ankles and wrists between two planks. back

* Copyright of English Heritage (1999)

English Heritage National Monuments Record