Information for record number MWA349:
Maxstoke Castle

Summary The remains of Maxstoke Castle, which was built during the Medieval period. It was situated 1km east of Castle Farm.
What Is It?  
Type: Castle
Period: Medieval (1066 AD - 1539 AD)
Where Is It?  
Parish: Maxstoke
District: North Warwickshire, Warwickshire
Grid Reference: SP 22 89
(Data represented on this map shows the current selected record as a single point, this is for illustrative purposes only and does not represent an accurate or complete representation of archaeological sites or features)
Level of Protection National - Old SMR PrefRef (Grade: )
Scheduled Monument (Grade: )
Listed Building (Grade: I)
Sites & Monuments Record
Picture(s) attached

 
Description

 
Source Number  

1 Sir William Clinton obtained licence to crenellate in 1346. The castle was built on a new site and a completely new layout was possible, and a perfectly symmetrical planned building was the result. It is rectangular, measuring about 55m from N-S and about 49m E-W. At each angle there is an octagonal tower 9m across, and in the centre of the E side is a gatehouse (PRN 351). The main building, of which part of the original walls still remain in the modern residence, was along the W side, and on the N and S there were subsidiary buildings, the evidence for which is to be seen in the corbels and other features on the main wall.
2 castle partly remodelled by the Earl of Stafford a century after its construction.
5 1967: In excellent condition. 1976: A private residence maintained in excellent order. The castle has survived intact and the fabric has been skilfully restored so that it presents an outstanding example of its period.
6 A number of Medieval floor tiles from Maxstoke castle were donated to Warwick Museum by P B Chatwin.
7 Descriptive text.
8 SAM List.
9 Photographed in 1977.
10 Archaeological recording of an extension to the Rear Hall at Maxstoke castle revealed no new evidence for the Medieval arrangements in this part of the building, although it appears that the masonry projection by the door through the curtain wall was post-Medieval, rather than part of a Medieval stair base. The main layer revealed was probably the surface left after the debris of the fire of 1762 had been removed.
11 Initiative from WM in 1977 to obtain more information about the castle.
12 Scheduling information from 1981.
13 Scheduling information from 1982.
14 Correspondence from 1982 and 1983 relating to a new building on the site of the Great Kitchen.
15 Plans for the building proposed in
13.
16 Letter from the DoE in 1977 about a proposed new building at the castle.
17 Undated large scale map of the castle and surrounding area.
18 Partial scheduling information from 1983.
 
Sources

Source No: 10
Source Type: Archaeological Report
Title: Archaeological Recording of extension to the Rear Hall at Maxtoke Castle
Author/originator: Palmer N
Date: 1997
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 2
Source Type: Bibliographic reference
Title: Victoria County History, vol 4, Warwickshire
Author/originator: Salzman L F (ed)
Date: 1947
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 4
   
Source No: 3
Source Type: Bibliographic reference
Title: Victoria County History, vol 4, Warwickshire
Author/originator: Salzman L F (ed)
Date: 1947
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 4
   
Source No: 14
Source Type: Correspondence
Title: Maxstoke Castle
Author/originator: Holland Hobbiss and S.T. Walker
Date: 1983
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 11
Source Type: Correspondence
Title: Maxstoke Castle
Author/originator: WM and owner of the Castle
Date: 1977
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 16
Source Type: Correspondence
Title: Maxstoke Castle
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1997
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 4
Source Type: Descriptive Text
Title: LBL
Author/originator: DoE
Date:
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 17
Source Type: Map
Title: Maxstoke Castle
Author/originator:
Date:
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 15
Source Type: Plan
Title: Maxstoke Castle
Author/originator: Holland and Hobbiss, architects
Date: 1982
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 9
Source Type: Record Card/Form
Title: SMR card: photograph
Author/originator:
Date: 2005
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 5
Source Type: Record Card/Form
Title: OS Card 29NW3
Author/originator: Ordnance Survey
Date: 1976
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 29NW3
   
Source No: 6
Source Type: Record Card/Form
Title: WM
Author/originator:
Date: 1951
Page Number: 139
Volume/Sheet: Accession card
   
Source No: 1
Source Type: Serial
Title: TBAS vol 67
Author/originator: Chatwin P B
Date: 1947
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 67
   
Source No: 12
Source Type: Scheduling record
Title: Maxstoke Castle (excluding inhabited parts)
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1981
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 13
Source Type: Scheduling record
Title: Maxstoke Castle (uninhabited parts)
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1982
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 18
Source Type: Scheduling record
Title: Maxstoke Castle
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1983
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 8
Source Type: Scheduling record
Title: Maxstoke Castle
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1986
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 7
Source Type: Scheduling record
Title: Maxstoke Castle
Author/originator: Ministry of Works/DoE
Date:
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Images:  
Maxstoke Castle, North Warwickshire
Copyright: Warwickshire County Council
Date: 2000
Click here for larger image  
 
Plan of Maxstoke Castle, North Warwickshire
Copyright: Warwickshire County Council
Date: 1997
Click here for larger image  
 
Maxtoke Castle and Moat
Copyright: Warwickshire County Council
Click here for larger image  
 
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Glossary

 
Word or Phrase
Description  
none Scheduled Monument Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) are those archaeological sites which are legally recognised as being of national importance. They can range in date from prehistoric times to the Cold War period. They can take many different forms, including disused buildings or sites surviving as earthworks or cropmarks.

SAMs are protected by law from unlicensed disturbance and metal detecting. Written consent from the Secretary of State must be obtained before any sort of work can begin, including archaeological work such as geophysical survey or archaeological excavation. There are nearly 200 SAMs in Warwickshire.
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designation Listed Building Buildings and structures, such as bridges, that are of architectural or historical importance are placed on a statutory list. These buildings are protected by planning and conservation acts that ensure that their special features of interest are considered before any alterations are made to them.

Depending on how important the buildings are they are classed as Grade I, Grade II* or Grade II. Grade I buildings are those of exceptional interest. Grade II* are particularly important buildings of more than special interest. Those listed as Grade II are those buildings that are regarded of special interest.
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source LBL Listed Building List. Buildings and structures, such as bridges, that are of architectural or historical importance are placed on a list. Buildings placed on the list are protected through various planning and conservation acts which ensure that their special features of interest are considered before any alterations are made to them. The Listed Buildings List is compiled and maintained by English Heritage. It includes details of where the building is, when it was built, a description of its appearance, and any other special features. back
source OS Card Ordnance Survey Record Card. Before the 1970s the Ordnance Survey (OS) were responsible for recording archaeological monuments during mapping exercises. This helped the Ordnance Survey to decide which monuments to publish on maps. During these exercises the details of the monuments were written down on record cards. Copies of some of the cards are kept at the Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record. The responsibility for recording archaeological monuments later passed to the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments. back
source SMR Card Sites and Monuments Record Card. The Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record began to be developed during the 1970s. The details of individual archaeological sites and findspots were written on record cards. These record cards were used until the 1990s, when their details were entered on to a computerised system. The record cards are still kept at the office of the Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record. back
source SAM List Scheduled Ancient Monument List. A list or schedule of archaelogical and historic monuments that are considered to be of national importance. The list contains a detailed description of each Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM) and a map showing their location and extent. By being placed on the schedule, SAMs are protected by law from any unauthorised distrubance. The list has been compiled and is maintained by English Heritage. It is updated periodically. back
source TBAS Transactions of the Birmingham and Warwickshire Archaeological Society is a journal produced by the society annually. It contains articles about archaeological field work that has taken place in Birmingham and Warwickshire in previous years. Copies of the journal are kept by the Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record. back
source WM Warwickshire Museum Aerial Photograph Collection. A collection of oblique and vertical aerial photographs and taken by various organisations and individuals, including the Royal Airforce, The Potato Board, Warwickshire Museum. The collection is held at the Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record. back
period Modern The Modern Period, about 1915 AD to the present (the 20th and 21st centuries AD)

In recent years archaeologists have realised the importance of recording modern sites. They do this so that in the future people will be able to look at the remains to help them understand the events to which they are related.
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period Medieval 1066 AD to 1539 AD (the 11th century AD to the 16th century AD)

The medieval period comes after the Saxon period and before the post medieval period.

The Medieval period begins in 1066 AD.
This was the year that the Normans, led by William the Conqueror (1066 – 1087), invaded England and defeated Harold Godwinson at the Battle of Hastings in East Sussex.
The Medieval period includes the first half of the Tudor period (1485 – 1603 AD), when the Tudor family reigned in England and eventually in Scotland too.

The end of the Medieval period is marked by Henry VIII’s (1509 – 1547) order for the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the years running up to 1539 AD. The whole of this period is sometimes called the Middle Ages.
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period modern About 1915 AD to the present (the 20th and 21st centuries AD)

In recent years archaeologists have realised the importance of recording modern sites. They do this so that in the future people will be able to look at the remains to help them understand the events to which they are related.
more ->
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monument LAYER * An archaeological unit of soil in a horizontal plane which may seal features or be cut through by other features. back
monument SITE * Unclassifiable site with minimal information. Specify site type wherever possible. back
monument BUILDING * A structure with a roof to provide shelter from the weather for occupants or contents. Use specific type where known. back
monument FLOOR * A layer of stone, brick or boards, etc, on which people tread. Use broader site type where known. back
monument FEATURE * Areas of indeterminate function. back
monument KITCHEN * A building or room where food is prepared and cooked. back
monument TOWER * A tall building, either round, square or polygonal in plan, used for a variety of purposes, including defence, as a landmark, for the hanging of bells, industrial functions, etc. Use more specific type where known. back
monument CASTLE * A fortress and dwelling, usually medieval in origin, and often consisting of a keep, curtain wall and towers etc. back
monument GATEHOUSE * A gateway with one or more chambers over the entrance arch; the flanking towers housing stairs and additional rooms. Use with wider site type where known. back
monument MUSEUM * A building, group of buildings or space within a building, where objects of value such as works of art, antiquities, scientific specimens, or other artefacts are housed and displayed. back
monument FARM * A tract of land, often including a farmhouse and ancillary buildings, used for the purpose of cultivation and the rearing of livestock, etc. Use more specific type where known. back
monument CURTAIN WALL * A wall between two towers or pavilions, usually surrounding a building, and often forming a major part of the defences. back
monument WALL * An enclosing structure composed of bricks, stones or similar materials, laid in courses. Use specific type where known. back

* Copyright of English Heritage (1999)

English Heritage National Monuments Record