Information for record number MWA586:
Church of St Laurence, Bidford on Avon

Summary The Church of St. Laurence was originally built during the Medieval period and was later altered during the Imperial period. It is situated south of the High Street, Bidford on Avon.
What Is It?  
Type: Church
Period: Medieval - Imperial (1066 AD - 1900 AD)
Where Is It?  
Parish: Bidford on Avon
District: Stratford on Avon, Warwickshire
Grid Reference: SP 10 51
(Data represented on this map shows the current selected record as a single point, this is for illustrative purposes only and does not represent an accurate or complete representation of archaeological sites or features)
Level of Protection National - Old SMR PrefRef (Grade: )
Listed Building (Grade: II*)
Sites & Monuments Record
Description

 
Source Number  

1 The church consists of a chancel with a N vestry and organ chamber, nave, N and S aisles, N porch, quire vestry in place of a S porch, and a W tower. The chancel, W end of the nave and W tower date from about 1250. The nave was long and narrow and may (in part) have been on the line of an earlier nave, but no 12th century details remain. In 1835 it was widened for about two thirds of its length and aisles of the same length were added. The chancel was restored in 1886-9 and the roof in 1922. No priest is mentioned at Domesday and at the time of Henry I Bidford was a chapelry of Salford.
4 Noted.
5 The section of churchyard wall contained no re-used architectural fragments either from the parish church or any other building. No dating evidence for the construction of the wall was found but the soil of the graveyard, immediately to the rear of the wall, did contain several fragments of human bone, suggesting a relatively long period of use and showing that burials had been placed right up to the churchyard boundary. The area of the churchyard has obviously been built up by its long iuse for burials. However the geological natural was visible within the section excavated for the wall and shows that the church was probably built on an existing piece of high ground.
6 Observation of the reinstatement of churchyard retaining wall recorded no archaeological finds or human remains.
 
Sources

Source No: 1
Source Type: Bibliographic reference
Title: Victoria County History, vol 3, Warwickshire
Author/originator: Salzman L F (ed)
Date: 1945
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 3
   
Source No: 3
Source Type: Bibliographic reference
Title: LBL
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1985
Page Number: 67
Volume/Sheet: Stratford-on-Avon We
   
Source No: 4
Source Type: Bibliographic reference
Title: The Buildings of England: Warwickshire
Author/originator: Pevsner N and Wedgwood A
Date: 1966
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: Warwicks
   
Source No: 5
Source Type: Building Survey
Title: Archaeological Recording at St. Laurence's Churchyard, Bidford-on-Avon, Warwickshire
Author/originator:
Date: 2006
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 2
Source Type: Record Card/Form
Title: OS Card 25NE6
Author/originator: Ordnance Survey
Date: 1968
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No:
Source Type: Watching Brief Report
Title: Watching Brief at St Laurence's Church, Bidford-on-Avon
Author/originator: C Coutts
Date: 2000
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 6
Source Type: Watching Brief Report
Title: Watching Brief at St Laurence's Church, Bidford-on-Avon
Author/originator: C Coutts
Date: 2000
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Images:  
There are no images associated with this record.  
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Glossary

 
Word or Phrase
Description  
designation Listed Building Buildings and structures, such as bridges, that are of architectural or historical importance are placed on a statutory list. These buildings are protected by planning and conservation acts that ensure that their special features of interest are considered before any alterations are made to them.

Depending on how important the buildings are they are classed as Grade I, Grade II* or Grade II. Grade I buildings are those of exceptional interest. Grade II* are particularly important buildings of more than special interest. Those listed as Grade II are those buildings that are regarded of special interest.
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source LBL Listed Building List. Buildings and structures, such as bridges, that are of architectural or historical importance are placed on a list. Buildings placed on the list are protected through various planning and conservation acts which ensure that their special features of interest are considered before any alterations are made to them. The Listed Buildings List is compiled and maintained by English Heritage. It includes details of where the building is, when it was built, a description of its appearance, and any other special features. back
source OS Card Ordnance Survey Record Card. Before the 1970s the Ordnance Survey (OS) were responsible for recording archaeological monuments during mapping exercises. This helped the Ordnance Survey to decide which monuments to publish on maps. During these exercises the details of the monuments were written down on record cards. Copies of some of the cards are kept at the Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record. The responsibility for recording archaeological monuments later passed to the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments. back
period Medieval 1066 AD to 1539 AD (the 11th century AD to the 16th century AD)

The medieval period comes after the Saxon period and before the post medieval period.

The Medieval period begins in 1066 AD.
This was the year that the Normans, led by William the Conqueror (1066 – 1087), invaded England and defeated Harold Godwinson at the Battle of Hastings in East Sussex.
The Medieval period includes the first half of the Tudor period (1485 – 1603 AD), when the Tudor family reigned in England and eventually in Scotland too.

The end of the Medieval period is marked by Henry VIII’s (1509 – 1547) order for the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the years running up to 1539 AD. The whole of this period is sometimes called the Middle Ages.
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period Imperial 1751 AD to 1914 AD (end of the 18th century AD to the beginning of the 20th century AD)

This period comes after the Post Medieval period and before the modern period and starts with beginning of the Industrial Revolution in 1750. It includes the second part of the Hannoverian period (1714 – 1836) and the Victorian period (1837 – 1901). The Imperial period ends with the start of the First World War in 1914.
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monument BUILDING * A structure with a roof to provide shelter from the weather for occupants or contents. Use specific type where known. back
monument BOUNDARY * The limit to an area as defined on a map or by a marker of some form, eg. BOUNDARY WALL. Use specific type where known. back
monument TOWER * A tall building, either round, square or polygonal in plan, used for a variety of purposes, including defence, as a landmark, for the hanging of bells, industrial functions, etc. Use more specific type where known. back
monument PARISH CHURCH * The foremost church within a parish. back
monument CHURCH * A building used for public Christian worship. Use more specific type where known. back
monument VESTRY * A room or part of a church where the vestments, vessels and records are kept. back
monument ARCHITECTURAL FRAGMENT * Use more specific term where known. back
monument CHURCHYARD * An area of ground belonging to a church, often used as a burial ground. back
monument BURIAL * An interment of human or animal remains. Use specific type where known. If component use with wider site type. Use FUNERARY SITE for optimum retrieval in searches. back
monument HUMAN REMAINS * The unarticulated remains of the body of a human being. If articulated use inhumation. back
monument WALL * An enclosing structure composed of bricks, stones or similar materials, laid in courses. Use specific type where known. back
monument RETAINING WALL * A wall constructed for the purpose of confining or supporting a mass of earth or water. back

* Copyright of English Heritage (1999)

English Heritage National Monuments Record