Information for record number MWA588:
Bidford Bridge

Summary Bidford Bridge, a Medieval Bridge with later alterations and repairs. It spans the Avon 200m west of St Laurence' s Church.
What Is It?  
Type: Bridge, Road Bridge
Period: Medieval - Modern (1066 AD - 2050 AD)
Where Is It?  
Parish: Bidford on Avon
District: Stratford on Avon, Warwickshire
Grid Reference: SP 09 51
(Data represented on this map shows the current selected record as a single point, this is for illustrative purposes only and does not represent an accurate or complete representation of archaeological sites or features)
Level of Protection National - Old SMR PrefRef (Grade: )
Scheduled Monument (Grade: )
Listed Building (Grade: I)
Sites & Monuments Record
Description

 
Source Number  

1 There are no characteristic features in the architecture of the bridge, but its massive proportions, its piers and buttresses, and the points in the arches, indicate that it is Medieval. The monks of Bordesley were no doubt the architects. It has 5 arches over the stream and 2 dry ones, and has the usual features of wedge-shaped buttresses against the stream, and triangular recesses for pedestrians. It has been widened in recent times, and its modern side has no features of interest, but the ancient side is of remarkable boldness. Indulgences were granted on at least one occasion for its repair.
2 Dates from the 15th century. In 1449 it was found to be very much decayed and a year's indulgence was offered to all who would contribute to repair. It consists of 8 arches of about 4.4m span with piers of about 2.7m. The cutwaters remain on the E side but have been removed on W, and the whole shows signs of frequent repairs. The N most, 2nd, 6th and 7th arches are original and are segmental-pointed or 4-centred. Leland in 1545 found that the bridge had been repaired with stones from Alcester Priory and some masonry of this date is visible. The bridge may originally have been of 9 or 10 arches. Charles I broke down the bridge and this was repaired in 1650. The 4th arch may be of this date and is higher than the others, possibly to admit the passage of boats.
3 Photograph of the bridge.
5 Early undated scheduling record.
6 Listing description.
7 Map relating to a planning proposal in 1966.
8 Correspondence from 1985 about repairs to the parapet.
 
Sources

Source No: 4
Source Type: Bibliographic reference
Title: LBL
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1985
Page Number: 67
Volume/Sheet: Stratford-on-Avon We
   
Source No: 2
Source Type: Bibliographic reference
Title: Victoria County History, vol 3, Warwickshire
Author/originator: Salzman L F (ed)
Date: 1945
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 3
   
Source No: 3
Source Type: Bibliographic reference
Title: Victoria County History, vol 3, Warwickshire
Author/originator: Salzman L F (ed)
Date: 1945
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 3
   
Source No: 8
Source Type: Correspondence
Title: Bidford Bridge
Author/originator: WM
Date: 1985
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 7
Source Type: Map
Title: Bidford
Author/originator: Alcester RDC
Date: 1966
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No:
Source Type: Plan
Title: Camp Hill Farmhouse
Author/originator: Robinson, Osborne & Moules, Chartered Surveyors
Date:
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Source No: 1
Source Type: Serial
Title: TBAS vol 42
Author/originator: Cossins J A
Date: 1916
Page Number: 9
Volume/Sheet: 42
   
Source No: 6
Source Type: Scheduling record
Title: SAM list 1986
Author/originator: DoE
Date: 1986
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet: 68
   
Source No: 5
Source Type: Scheduling record
Title: Bidford Bridge
Author/originator: Ministry of Wworks/DoE
Date:
Page Number:
Volume/Sheet:
   
Images:  
There are no images associated with this record.  
back to top

Glossary

 
Word or Phrase
Description  
none Scheduled Monument Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) are those archaeological sites which are legally recognised as being of national importance. They can range in date from prehistoric times to the Cold War period. They can take many different forms, including disused buildings or sites surviving as earthworks or cropmarks.

SAMs are protected by law from unlicensed disturbance and metal detecting. Written consent from the Secretary of State must be obtained before any sort of work can begin, including archaeological work such as geophysical survey or archaeological excavation. There are nearly 200 SAMs in Warwickshire.
back
designation Listed Building Buildings and structures, such as bridges, that are of architectural or historical importance are placed on a statutory list. These buildings are protected by planning and conservation acts that ensure that their special features of interest are considered before any alterations are made to them.

Depending on how important the buildings are they are classed as Grade I, Grade II* or Grade II. Grade I buildings are those of exceptional interest. Grade II* are particularly important buildings of more than special interest. Those listed as Grade II are those buildings that are regarded of special interest.
back
source LBL Listed Building List. Buildings and structures, such as bridges, that are of architectural or historical importance are placed on a list. Buildings placed on the list are protected through various planning and conservation acts which ensure that their special features of interest are considered before any alterations are made to them. The Listed Buildings List is compiled and maintained by English Heritage. It includes details of where the building is, when it was built, a description of its appearance, and any other special features. back
source SAM List Scheduled Ancient Monument List. A list or schedule of archaelogical and historic monuments that are considered to be of national importance. The list contains a detailed description of each Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM) and a map showing their location and extent. By being placed on the schedule, SAMs are protected by law from any unauthorised distrubance. The list has been compiled and is maintained by English Heritage. It is updated periodically. back
source TBAS Transactions of the Birmingham and Warwickshire Archaeological Society is a journal produced by the society annually. It contains articles about archaeological field work that has taken place in Birmingham and Warwickshire in previous years. Copies of the journal are kept by the Warwickshire Sites and Monuments Record. back
period Modern The Modern Period, about 1915 AD to the present (the 20th and 21st centuries AD)

In recent years archaeologists have realised the importance of recording modern sites. They do this so that in the future people will be able to look at the remains to help them understand the events to which they are related.
more ->
back
period Medieval 1066 AD to 1539 AD (the 11th century AD to the 16th century AD)

The medieval period comes after the Saxon period and before the post medieval period.

The Medieval period begins in 1066 AD.
This was the year that the Normans, led by William the Conqueror (1066 – 1087), invaded England and defeated Harold Godwinson at the Battle of Hastings in East Sussex.
The Medieval period includes the first half of the Tudor period (1485 – 1603 AD), when the Tudor family reigned in England and eventually in Scotland too.

The end of the Medieval period is marked by Henry VIII’s (1509 – 1547) order for the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the years running up to 1539 AD. The whole of this period is sometimes called the Middle Ages.
more ->
back
period modern About 1915 AD to the present (the 20th and 21st centuries AD)

In recent years archaeologists have realised the importance of recording modern sites. They do this so that in the future people will be able to look at the remains to help them understand the events to which they are related.
more ->
back
monument STONE * Use only where stone is natural or where there is no indication of function. back
monument ARCH * A structure over an opening usually formed of wedge-shaped blocks of brick or stone held together by mutual pressure and supported at the sides; they can also be formed from moulded concrete/ cast metal. A component; use for free-standing structure only. back
monument FEATURE * Areas of indeterminate function. back
monument FARMHOUSE * The main dwelling-house of a farm, it can be either detached from or attached to the working buildings. back
monument PRIORY * A monastery governed by a prior or prioress. Use with narrow terms of DOUBLE HOUSE, FRIARY, MONASTERY or NUNNERY. back
monument CHURCH * A building used for public Christian worship. Use more specific type where known. back
monument PIER * A structure of iron or wood, open below, running out into the sea and used as a promenade and landing stage. back
monument BRIDGE * A structure of wood, stone, iron, brick or concrete, etc, with one or more intervals under it to span a river or other space. Use specific type where known. back
monument ROAD BRIDGE * A bridge carrying a road over land or water. back
monument SIGN * A board, wall painting or other structure displaying advice, giving information or directions back
monument STREAM * A natural flow or current of water issuing from a source. back

* Copyright of English Heritage (1999)

English Heritage National Monuments Record